Drinks

Krypton 81 helps track ancient water source of Nubian Aquifer, shared by Egypt, Libya, Chad and Sudan; technique could track brine in NM, where radioactive waste is stored

By Felicity Barringer

The New York Times 2011-11-21

As Texas faces worst single-year drought ever and drinking wells fail, natural gas industry has unlimited water use; fracking taints water, removing it from hydrologic cycle

By Josh Harkinson

Mother Jones 2011-09-01

Water limits are close to being reached or being breached in areas of northern China, India's Punjab and western U.S., says report that urges farming overhaul

Reuters; BusinessWorld (Manila, Philippines) 2011-08-24

Work out a few equations, and anyone can calculate the amount of ice needed to cool a can of soda or beer

By Rhett Allain

Wired.com 2011-07-04

Senator Ben Cardin aims for clean water accord, balancing Americans' biggest environmental concern against agriculture, homebuilding, mining industries

By Paul Quinlan

Greenwire; The New York Times 2011-07-01

Droughts in Colombia, Brazil will force conservation at coffee farms and through supply chains; just one part of high-labor drink consumes 1,100 parts of water

By Leon Kaye

The Guardian (UK) 2011-06-17

Opinion: In "The Big Thirst," author's purpose is to create understanding of humanity's relationship to water in hopes of diverting impending water crisis that need not be

By Kathleen Parker

The Washington Post 2011-05-27

Opinion: New Clean Water Act guidelines are first step in restoring safeguards to wetlands, streams threatened by development, pollution; EPA should convert them to rule

By the editors

The New York Times 2011-04-28

EPA head vows to order testing for radioactivity at water treatment plants that receive fracking drilling wastewater as well as intake sites for drinking water downstream

By John Collins Rdolf

The New York Times 2011-03-03

Years of efforts by some lawmakers and regulators to force feds to better police natural gas industry thwarted; now lobbyists point to fuel independence, fewer emissions

By Ian Urbina

The New York Times 2011-03-04

Lawmakers launch investigation into health risks of drilling for natural gas on public lands; critics of practice cite potential for drinking-water pollution, environmental damage

By Andrew Restuccia

The Hill 2011-02-28

Oil/gas group says "Gasland," with its flaming tap water and reference to 596 chemicals used in fracking, should be ineligible for Oscar in best documentary feature due to errors

By Rebecca Keegan

Los Angeles Times 2011-02-15

USDA resorts to imported wasps in attempt to control wildly thirsty invasive weed that has drained habitats, pushed species of fish to extinction and is taking over Rio Grande Valley

By Saul Elbein

The Texas Observer 2011-01-25

Books: In "Hot," author Mark Hertsgaard presents strong case that there is still time to keep planet livable despite climate change; technology exists, but we must act now

By Wen Stephenson

The New York Times 2011-02-04

EPA head vows to review hexavalent chromium by summer and to consider ordering cities to start testing for toxic metal in tap water; industry has fought limits for years

By Michael Hawthorne

Chicago Tribune 2010-12-21

Shale gas production linked to tainted drinking water; in Texas, EPA warns of risk of explosion, and in Pennsylvania, firm will pay residents $4.1 million and install water-treatment systems

By Ana Campoy and Daniel Gilbert

The Wall Street Journal. (may require subscription) 2010-12-17

As business booms for restaurants, road paving, motels in towns over natural gas deposits contained in Marcellus Shale, critics of fracking worry over safety of drinking water

By Kris Maher

The Wall Street Journal. (may require subscription) 2010-12-14

United Nations asks for $164 million donation to bring in additional water-purification equipment, doctors, medicines to fight cholera epidemic in Haiti

By Frank Jordans

The Associated Press; The Washington Post 2010-11-12

Cholera epidemic death toll reaches 583 across Haiti; health officials expect tens of thousands more infections from tainted drinking water in next few years

BBC 2010-11-09

EPA asks Halliburton Co., others, to disclose lists of chemicals they use in fracking for natural gas for study on potential threats to drinking water

By Jim Efstathiou Jr.

Bloomberg.com 2010-09-09

In Nutrient Density to Climate Impact index, milk wins over bottled carbonated water, soy drink, soft drink, orange juice, beer, red wine, oat drink

By Jess Halliday

nutraingredients.com/Decision News Media 2010-08-30

Mountain-top mining more damaging than urbanization on local water quality, stream composition, researchers learn

By Natasha Gilbert

Nature News 2010-08-09

Furor erupts over provision in energy bill requiring disclosure of chemicals used in fracking for natural gas; process currently is mostly exempt from Safe Drinking Water Act

CQ Politics 2010-07-28

California's patchwork regulatory efforts leave drinking water tainted by nitrates, the byproduct of nitrogen-based fertilizer, manure, wastewater treatment plants, septic tanks

By Julia Scott

San Francisco Chronicle 2010-05-17

Fashion for screw-cap wines undermines renewable cork forest management strategy, could lead to extinction of rarest wildcats and loss of 100,000 jobs, experts say

By Louise Gray

Telegraph (UK) 2010-07-16

In Pennsylvania, epicenter of battle over fracking for natural gas, EPA hears stories of yellowed and foul-smelling well water, deformed livestock, poisoned fish, itchy skin

By Tom Zeller Jr.

The New York Times 2010-07-23

Competing interests - jobs, drinking water safety, water depletion - push Delaware River group to reconsider rules on fracking; drilling firm names chemicals it uses

By Geoff Mulvhill and Marc Levy

The Associated Press; Chicago Tribune 2010-07-14

EPA will study effect of "fracking" for natural gas on drinking-water supplies; technique requires millions of gallons of water, leaves some tainted

By Juliet Eilperin

The Washington Post 2010-03-19

Economic downturn, bottled-water backlash, pollution worries whet thirst for filtered tap water

By Gwendolyn Bounds

The Wall Street Journal. (may require subscription) 2010-03-10

Review: Flaming tap water, fracking and other dirty water, air tales from natural-gas drilling in "GasLand," a new documentary

By Robert Koehler

Variety 2010-01-25

Lobbyists fight soda tax as health care reform funding source

During the first nine months of 2009, soda makers, supermarket companies, agriculture, fast-food business spent more than $24 million lobbying Congress on issue of tax on sweetened beverages plus other legislative and regulatory issues, reports show. Coalition fears what could be movement to raise money for health care reform by taxing sweetened beverages. Farm-dominated Senate Finance Committee sympathetic to food industry; Max Baucus hails from Montana, large producer of sugar beets; Iowa, home state of Chuck Grassley, is nation's largest producer of corn.

By Christine Spolar and Joseph Eaton

The Huffington Post 2009-11-06

Orange juice demand ramps up as swine flu continues

Orange juice demand ramps up as swine flu continues

USDA

Swine flu, now present in 46 states, plus approaching winter season increases demand for orange juice, but Florida orange crop expected to be 16 percent smaller than last year after cold snaps last winter were followed by drought conditions, citrus disease. And: Immune boosters during cold/flu season include yogurt with probiotics, lemon juice, garlic, and brightly colored fruits and vegetables, especially orange ones like sweet potatoes and carrots (click 'See also').

By Tom Sellen

The Wall Street Journal. (may require subscription) 2009-11-02

See also 

Water mapping satellite launched in Russia

Water mapping satellite launched in Russia

AOES Medialab

European spacecraft SMOS set to make first global maps of amount of moisture held in soils, quantity of salts dissolved in oceans, and how water is cycled around Earth. Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite is second of eight in European Space Agency's Earth Explorer program - the first, Goce, is mapping variations in gravity; Cryosat, next up, will assess state of world's ice cover. And: Data will be useful in agriculture, water resources management (click 'See also').

By Jonathan Amos

BBC News 2009-11-01

See also 

Toxins at Cold War-era missile sites threaten water supplies

Cleanup continues at dozens of former nuclear missile sites tainted with trichloroethylene, or TCE. In Colorado, one site is near Poudre River, where planned reservoir would partly submerge site and could contaminate river, municipal water supplies. In '90s, chemical was discovered in Cheyenne city wells, which are within eight-mile-long plume of TCE within Ogallala Aquifer. Cleanup is part of work at 9,000-plus sites projected to cost $17.8 billion. And: Pentagon, nation's biggest polluter, has about 25,000 contaminated properties across U.S. (click 'See also').

By Mead Gruver

The Associated Press; The Washington Post 2009-10-11

See also 

Buried dump beneath closed park leaches toxins into water

As Connecticut city proposes $2 million for running waterlines to residences near former park atop a buried and leaking landfill, neighbors worry about health effects of drinking tainted well water. 'I'm no tree hugger, but this just ain't right,' says one, whose wife has psoriasis and whose preschooler has hair loss. Landfill, unlined and permeable, is bordered by wetlands to north. Toxins also threaten city's aquifer and North Stamford Reservoir. Full-scale cleanup unlikely; EPA says city is providing appropriate response.

By Magdalene Perez

The Advocate (Stamford, CT) 2009-09-27

EPA lacks oversight on safety of school water

In last 10 years, toxins found in drinking water of public and private schools in all 50 states, but problem has gone largely unmonitored by feds. EPA lacks authority to require testing for all schools; it does not specifically monitor incoming state data on school water quality. Tainting most apparent at schools with wells. Schools with unsafe water represent small percentage of nation's 132,500 schools; EPA says violations spiked because of stricter standards for arsenic, disinfectants, other toxins. And: It's time to ban arsenic from chicken feed (click 'See also').

By Garance Burke

The Associated Press; The Washington Post 2009-09-25

See also 

Soda tax gains traction as health care funding source

Prominent doctors, scientists, policy makers say soda tax could be powerful weapon in reducing obesity, as cigarette taxes help curb smoking. Tax of penny per ounce on soft drinks, energy drinks, sports beverages, many juices and iced teas would raise $14.9 billion in its first year. Soda research shows that for every 10 percent rise in price, consumption falls 8 to 10 percent. Expert says tax is justified in part because obesity, diabetes often treated with public funds through Medicaid, Medicare.

By William Neuman

The New York TImes 2009-09-16

Violations of Clean Water Act rampant across nation

One in 10 Americans exposed to drinking water tainted with dangerous chemicals or that fails federal standards. Clean Water Act has been violated more than 506,000 times since 2004 by 23,000-plus firms, facilities. Fewer than 3 percent of violations resulted in fines or other significant punishments. Enforcement lapses were particularly bad under George W. Bush, EPA employees said. Farm pollution, livestock runoff largely unregulated. Best solution is for Congress to hold EPA, states accountable, lawmakers, activists say; others say public outrage is required. And: Interactive database of hundreds of thousands of water pollution records from every state and EPA (click 'See also').

By Charles Duhigg

The New York TImes 2009-09-13

See also 

Spiking weedkiller in drinking water OK, says EPA; critics disagree

EPA says Americans aren't exposed to unsafe levels of atrazine, a weedkiller used on cornfields, gardens, lawns, golf courses that washes into drinking water, particularly in summer. Others say EPA rules are insufficient, that local water systems must monitor atrazine more often, issue alerts of spikes. 43 water systems sue Syngenta, other chemical companies to force them to pay for removing poison from water. Studies suggest link of small amounts of atrazine to birth defects, premature births, menstrual woes. Home filtration system can avoid exposure. And: Atrazine linked to frog decline, egg production in male fish, and found in Washington, D.C.'s Potomac River (click 'See also').

By Charles Duhigg

The New York Times 2009-08-22

See also 

Determined mother uncovers trail to polluted drinking water

After Illinois mother refuses to stop asking questions about her teenage son's leukemia during toddler time, state officials and newspaper learn that for 20-plus years, town frequently, secretly, turned valve to draw water from well polluted with dry-cleaning chemicals. State EPA shut well in December 2007, after testing water for first time in 20-plus years. Update: Federal agents raid Crestwood Village Hall, cart documents away for criminal investigation; senator asks feds to look for links between water, illnesses (click 'See also').

By Michael Hawthorne

Chicago Tribune 2009-04-19

See also 

Health hazards in 'Poisoned Waters'

Health hazards in 'Poisoned Waters'

PBS/Frontline

Toxins from industry, agriculture, massive suburban development and from face creams, deodorants, prescription medicines and household cleaners now found in drinking water, threatening fish, wildlife and, potentially, human health, Hedrick Smith reports in PBS Frontline program (watch at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/poisonedwaters/view/). And: Study shows pesticide's insidious effect on food chain (click 'See also').

By Diane Buxton

WGBH/Frontline 2009-04-14

See also 

Perchlorate found in baby formula, CDC reports

Fifteen of 15 powdered infant formulas contain perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel linked to thyroid disease, says CDC study, but scientists haven't named brands tested. Legislator calls on EPA to set safe drinking water standard for perchlorate, water testing. And: Pasadena begins construction of perchlorate-removing water treatment plant near Superfund site. Wells nearby have been shut down (click 'See also').

By Liz Szabo

USA Today 2009-04-02

See also 

Community considers recycling water, toilet to tap

California community considers reclaiming wastewater for drinking water to augment supply, but proposal details are scarce. Opponents worry water that goes from toilet to tap can contain traces of hormones, drugs, chemicals. And: After conservation measures, all regional water agencies should explore sewage water option, says editorial (click 'See also').

By Angela Lau

The San Diego Union Tribune 2009-01-23

See also 

Space station processes urine, bathwater to drinking water

Space station processes urine, bathwater to drinking water

NASA

Sandra Magnus at work on the water recovery system.

NASA reports successful repairs on water regeneration system, which processes urine, perspiration and bathwater into drinking water. Reliable system is required to support expanded crew of six astronauts, scheduled for arrival in May 2009. Station's kitchen also was updated.

BBC 2008-11-25

Opinion/Blog: Clean water to drink

Opinion/Blog: Clean water to drink

Xuan Li

Pathogens cling to iron oxide nanoparticles, purifying drinking water.

Grad student discovers cheap way to filter viruses and arsenic from drinking water, and tells the secret at American Chemical Society meeting. He uses glass fibers as a sturdy support for positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles, which attract pathogens with negative charge.

By Aaron Rowe

Wired 2008-04-12

Drink of astronauts?

To save weight, advanced space missions won't pack sufficient water; instead, NASA plans to condense drinking water from perspiration, respiration and urine.

By Larry Greenemeier

Scientific American 2007-10-26

Opinion: Water woe

Scrutinizing food ingredients is crucial, but because the water we drink is the same as the water in our toilets, we tolerate the presence of chemicals that would be banned as food additives; it's time to filter drinking water for all.

By Robert D. Morris

The New York Times 2007-10-03

Opinion: Water problem

Mountaintop removal coal mining, with toxic leftovers shoved into streams, foul residents' water and kill the fish; study traces mining pollution to children's nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and shortness of breath; long-term effects unknown.

By Eric Reece

Orion Magazine 2006-01-01

One bug or two?

One bug or two?

Seeking sales, food processors add crushed insects to yogurt and grapefruit juice, titanium dioxide to Betty Crocker's white frosting, and dye to fish and chicken feed, but FDA rules are lax on ingredients disclosure, so labels might read 'artificial color.'

By Pallavi Gogoi

Business Week Online 2006-10-01

Water wise:

With federal quality standards for bottled water less stringent than they are for tap water and 2 million tons of polyethylene bottles trashed every year in U.S., it makes sense to fill a reusable bottle with filtered water at home, then pack it for work or school.

By Eviana Hartman

Washington Post

See also 

Greening caffeine

Starbucks, learning early on that carbon emissions would affect rainfall and temperatures, thus affecting price, quantity and quality of coffee beans (and its bottom line), calculated its carbon footprint and is working to lower the number; other companies are coy.

Sonia Narang

Forbes magazine

Supplement setback:

Cargill's attempt to add Regenasure, a vegetarian version of shellfish-derived glucosamine, to European list of food products for addition in mostly beverages and fermented milk products, hits snag with questions of safety for diabetics.

By Alex McNally

nutraingredients.com